Additions to Esther
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Christian
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The Book of Esther, also known in Hebrew as "the Scroll" (Megillah), is a book in the third section (Ketuvim, "Writings") of the Jewish Tanakh (the Hebrew Bible) and in the Christian Old Testament. It is one of the five Scrolls (Megillot) in the Hebrew Bible. It relates the story of a Hebrew woman in Persia, born as Hadassah but known as Esther, who becomes queen of Persia and thwarts a genocide of her people. The story forms the core of the Jewish festival of Purim, during which it is read aloud twice: once in the evening and again the following morning. The books of Esther and Song of Songs are the only books in the Hebrew Bible that do not explicitly mention God.
Additions to Esther
Deuterocanonical collection

Chapter 10

Then Mardocheus said, God hath done these things.

For I remember a dream which I saw concerning these matters, and nothing thereof hath failed.

A little fountain became a river, and there was light, and the sun, and much water: this river is Esther, whom the king married, and made queen:

And the two dragons are I and Aman.

And the nations were those that were assembled to destroy the name of the Jews:

And my nation is this Israel, which cried to God, and were saved: for the Lord hath saved his people, and the Lord hath delivered us from all those evils, and God hath wrought signs and great wonders, which have not been done among the Gentiles.

Therefore hath he made two lots, one for the people of God, and another for all the Gentiles.

And these two lots came at the hour, and time, and day of judgment, before God among all nations.

So God remembered his people, and justified his inheritance.

Therefore those days shall be unto them in the month Adar, the fourteenth and fifteenth day of the same month, with an assembly, and joy, and with gladness before God, according to the generations for ever among his people.


Chapter 11

In the fourth year of the reign of Ptolemeus and Cleopatra, Dositheus, who said he was a priest and Levite, and Ptolemeus his son, brought this epistle of Phurim, which they said was the same, and that Lysimachus the son of Ptolemeus, that was in Jerusalem, had interpreted it.

In the second year of the reign of Artexerxes the great, in the first day of the month Nisan, Mardocheus the son of Jairus, the son of Semei, the son of Cisai, of the tribe of Benjamin, had a dream;

Who was a Jew, and dwelt in the city of Susa, a great man, being a servitor in the king’s court.

He was also one of the captives, which Nabuchodonosor the king of Babylon carried from Jerusalem with Jechonias king of Judea; and this was his dream: