Epistle of Jeremiah
Jeremiah
Christian
0:12 h
The Letter of Jeremiah, also known as the Epistle of Jeremiah, is a deuterocanonical book of the Old Testament; this letter purports to have been written by Jeremiah to the Jews who were about to be carried away as captives to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar. It is included in Catholic Bibles as the final chapter of the Book of Baruch. It is also included in Orthodox Bibles as a standalone book. Some scholars claim that the title of this work is misleading, as they consider it to be neither a letter nor written by the prophet Jeremiah.

Epistle of Jeremiah

Deuterocanonical Collection

Chapter 6

A copy of an epistle, which Jeremy sent unto them which were to be led captives into Babylon by the king of the Babylonians, to certify them, as it was commanded him of God.

Because of the sins which ye have committed before God, ye shall be led away captives into Babylon by Nabuchodonosor king of the Babylonians.

So when ye be come unto Babylon, ye shall remain there many years, and for a long season, namely, seven generations: and after that I will bring you away peaceably from thence.

Now shall ye see in Babylon gods of silver, and of gold, and of wood, borne upon shoulders, which cause the nations to fear.

Beware therefore that ye in no wise be like to strangers, neither be ye and of them, when ye see the multitude before them and behind them, worshipping them.

But say ye in your hearts, O Lord, we must worship thee.

For mine angel is with you, and I myself caring for your souls.

As for their tongue, it is polished by the workman, and they themselves are gilded and laid over with silver; yet are they but false, and cannot speak.

And taking gold, as it were for a virgin that loveth to go gay, they make crowns for the heads of their gods.

Sometimes also the priests convey from their gods gold and silver, and bestow it upon themselves.

Yea, they will give thereof to the common harlots, and deck them as men with garments, [being] gods of silver, and gods of gold, and wood.

Yet cannot these gods save themselves from rust and moth, though they be covered with purple raiment.

They wipe their faces because of the dust of the temple, when there is much upon them.

And he that cannot put to death one that offendeth him holdeth a sceptre, as though he were a judge of the country.

He hath also in his right hand a dagger and an ax: but cannot deliver himself from war and thieves.

Whereby they are known not to be gods: therefore fear them not.