Rig Veda. Book 5
Various
Hindu
2:30 h
The Rigveda (Sanskrit: ऋग्वेद ṛgveda, from ṛc “praise” and veda “knowledge”) is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns along with associated commentaries on liturgy, ritual and mystical exegesis. It is one of the four sacred canonical texts (śruti) of Hinduism known as the Vedas. The core text, known as the Rigveda Samhita, is a collection of 1,028 hymns (sūktas) in about 10,600 verses (called ṛc, eponymous of the name Rigveda), organized into ten books (maṇḍalas). In the eight books that were composed the earliest, the hymns are mostly praise of specific deities. The younger books (books 1 and 10) in part also deal with philosophical or speculative questions, with the virtue of dāna (charity) in society and with other metaphysical issues in their hymns.
The Rig Veda
Ralph T.H. Griffith, Translator
Book 5

HYMN I. Agni

Agni is wakened by the people's fuel to meet the Dawn who cometh like a milch-cow.
Like young trees shooting up on high their branches, his flames are rising to the vault of heaven.

For worship of the Gods the Priest was wakened: at morning gracious Agni hath arisen.
Kindled, his radiant might is made apparent, and the great Deity set free from darkness.

When he hath stirred the line of his attendants, with the pure milk pure Agni is anointed.
The strength-bestowing gift is then made ready, which spread in front, with tongues, erect, he drinketh.

The spirits of the pious turn together to Agni, as the eyes of all to Sūrya.
He, when both Dawns of different hues have borne him, springs up at daybreak as a strong white charger.

The noble One was born at days' beginning, laid red in colour mid the well-laid fuel.
Yielding in every house his seven rich treasures, Agni is seated, Priest most skilled in worship.

Agni hath sat him down, a Priest most skilful, on a sweet-smelling place, his Mother's bosom.
Young, faithful, sage, preeminent o’er many, kindled among the folk whom he sustaineth.

This Singer excellent at sacrifices, Agni the Priest, they glorify with homage.
Him who spread out both worlds by Law Eternal they balm with oil, strong Steed who never faileth.

He, worshipful House-Friend, in his home is worshipped, our own auspicious guest, lauded by sages.
That strength the Bull with thousand horns possesses. In might, O Agni, thou excellest others.

Thou quickly passest by all others, Agni, for him to whom thou hast appeared most lovely,
Wondrously fair, adorable, effulgent, the guest of men, the darling of the people.

To thee, Most Youthful God! to thee, O Agni from near and far the people bring their tribute.
Mark well the prayer of him who best extols thee. Great, high, auspicious, Agni, is thy shelter.

Ascend to-day thy splendid car, O Agni, in splendour, with the Holy Ones around it.
Knowing the paths by mid-air's spacious region bring hither Gods to feast on our oblation.

To him adorable, sage, strong and mighty we have sung forth our song of praise and homage.
Gavisthira hath raised with prayer to Agni this laud far-reaching, like gold light to heaven.


HYMN II. Agni.

THE youthful Mother keeps the Boy in secret pressed to her close, nor yields him to the Father.
But, when he lies upon the arm, the people see his unfading countenance before them.