Sutra Collection (B)
Unknown
Buddhist
8:40 h
Sutra (Sanskrit: सूत्र, romanized: sūtra, lit. 'string, thread') in Indian literary traditions refers to an aphorism or a collection of aphorisms in the form of a manual or, more broadly, a condensed manual or text. In Buddhism, sutras, also known as suttas, are canonical scriptures, many of which are regarded as records of the oral teachings of Gautama Buddha. They are not aphoristic, but are quite detailed, sometimes with repetition.
Sutra Collection
-B-

Baalapandita Sutta

To Recognize the Fool and the Wise One

I heard thus:

At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anaathapindika in Jeta’s grove in Saavatthi. The Blessed One addressed the Bhikkhus from there.

‘Bhikkhus, these three are the marks, characteristics and attainments of the fool. What are the three? The fool has foolish thoughts, foolish words and foolish actions. If the fool was not with foolish thoughts, words and actions, how are the wise to know this good person is a fool, an unworthy one. Since the fool thinks, speaks and acts foolishly, the wise know he is a fool. The fool experiences unpleasantness and displeasure here and now in three ways. Bhikkhus, if the fool is with a crowd, in the street corner or a junction, and if the people there were talking about some current topic, and if he destroyed living things, took the not given, misbehaved sexually, told lies and took intoxicating drinks, it occurs to him: “These things the people are talking are evident in me too.” This is the first instance that the fool experiences unpleasantness and displeasure.

Again, Bhikkhus, the fool sees an offender taken hold by the king and given various kinds of torture, caned and whipped, flogged with the jungle rope, flogged with the soiled stick, hands severed, legs severed, or both hands and legs severed, ears and nose severed, put in the boiling gruel pot, shell tonsured, put in Raahu’s mouth, garlanded with the blazing garland, hands scorched, the bark dress given, put with snakes, putting hooks in the flesh, cutting pieces of flesh from the body, driving a spike from ear to ear, beating to make the body like straw, immersing in the boiling oil, giving to the dogs to be eaten, raising on a spike alive until dead, and cutting the neck with the sword. Bhikkhus, then it occurs to the fool, for the reason of doing evil this robber, this evil doer is punished. If the king gets hold of me, I too will be subjected to these same punishments. This is the second instance that the fool experiences unpleasantness and displeasure.

Again, Bhikkhus, when the fool is relaxed on a chair, on the bed or on a cover on the floor, he thinks of his misbehaviors by body, speech and mind. At such times they press on him heavily. Like the shadow of a huge mountain peak, would fall on the earth heavily in the evening…In the same manner when the fool is relaxed on a chair, on the bed or on a cover on the floor, he thinks of his misbehaviors by body, speech and mind. At such times they press on him heavily. Bhikkhus, then it occurs to the fool. ‘I did not do good and create merit. I didn’t dispel the fear of the frightened, I did evil bloody acts and later I will reap their results.’ He grieves, laments, beats his breast and comes to great bewilderment of mind. Bhikkhus, this is the third instance that the fool experiences unpleasantness and displeasure.

Bhikkhus, the fool misbehaving by body, speech and mind, at the break up of the body after death, goes to decrease, is born in hell. Saying it rightly that hell is completely unwelcome and disagreeable. It is not easy to give a comparison for that unpleasantness.

Then a certain Bhikkhu said. ‘Venerable sir, is it possible to give a comparison?’

The Blessed One said, ‘It is possible Bhikkhu. An evil doer, a robber is taken hold and shown to the king and is told, ‘Great king, this is a robber, an evil doer, mete the suitable punishment to him.’ Then the king would say. ‘Good one, whip this person six thousand times in the morning.’ He is whipped six thousand times in the morning. In the mid day the king would ask ‘Good one, how is that man?’ ‘Great king he is alive as he was.’ Then the king would say, ‘Good one, whip this person six thousand times in the midday.’ He is whipped six thousand times in the mid day. In the evening the king would ask ‘Good one, how is that man?’ ‘Great king he is alive as he was.’ Then the king would say. ‘Good one, whip this person six thousand times in the evening.’ He is whipped six thousand times in the evening. Bhikkhus would that man whipped six thousand times three times a day feel unpleasant and displeased?’

‘Even if given sixty whips, he would feel unpleasant and displeased, so what to speak of it when given six thousand whips three times a day’

Then the Blessed One took a small stone that fitted his fist and addressed the Bhikkhus. ‘Bhikkhus, which is bigger in size, the stone in my fist or the Himalaya mountains?’

‘Venerable sir, the stone in your fist cannot be reckoned as a comparison, not even as a quarter, nor even as a sign for the Great Himalayas’

‘In the same manner Bhikkhus, the unpleasantness and displeasure experienced on account of giving six thousand whips three times a day cannot be reckoned as a comparison, not even as a quarter, nor even as a sign for the unpleasantness and displeasure experienced in hell. The warders of hell give him the fivefold binding. That is two hot iron spikes are sent through his two palms, and two other hot spikes are sent through his two feet and the fifth hot iron spike is sent through his chest. On account of this he experiences sharp piercing unpleasant feelings. Yet he does not die, until his demerit finishes.

Next the warders of hell conduct him and hammer him. On account of this he experiences sharp piercing unpleasant feelings. Yet he does not die, until his demerit finishes. Next the warders of hell take him upside down and cut him with a knife. On account of this too he experiences sharp piercing unpleasant feelings. Yet he does not die, until his demerit finishes. Next the warders of hell yoke him to a cart and make him go to and fro on a ground that is flaming and ablaze. On account of this too he experiences sharp piercing unpleasant feelings. Yet he does not die, until his demerit finishes. Next the warders of hell make him ascend and descend a rock of burning ambers. On account of this he experiences sharp piercing unpleasant feelings. Yet he does not die, until his demerit finishes.

Next the warders of hell throw him upside down into a boiling, blazing pot of molten copper. There he is cooked in the molten scum, and he on his own accord dives in, comes up and goes across in the molten pot. On account of this too he experiences sharp piercing unpleasant feelings. Yet he does not die, until his demerit finishes. Next the warders of hell throw him to the Great Hell. Bhikkhus, the Great Hell is square and has four gates. It’s divided into two and is enclosed with an iron wall. The top is closed with an iron lid. The floor spreads up to seven hundred miles and it stands there everyday.

I may explain the unpleasantness of the hell in various ways, yet it is not easy to explain that unpleasantness completely.